Massachusetts Financial Services Company Settles Retirement Benefits ERISA Class Action for $6.9 Million

Class Members in an ERISA class action against MFS Investment Management secured a $6.9 million settlement with who claimed the company mismanaged their retirement savings. The Plaintiffs in the Class Action alleged that MFS breached its fiduciary duties and engaged in prohibited transactions.

According to the settlement proposal, the $6.9 million amount represents about 30% of the damages the workers could recover if they were to prove liability and maximum damages on all of their claims. The result is impressive both for dollar amount per class member (about $2,291) and the percentage of the plan’s assets (about .72%) it represents.

The pact also requires MSF to make the qualified default investment alternative for the plan a non-proprietary fund for at least three years following the settlement, and the company will also have to retain an unaffiliated third-party investment consultant to evaluate the plan’s lineup every year over the same period.

The proposed class has roughly 3,000 members based on information that was provided by MFS.

The case is Velazquez v. Massachusetts Financial Services Company et al., case number 1:17-cv-11249, in the U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts.


This blog is intended to provide information to the general public and to practitioners about developments that may impact Oregon class actions.

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Steve Larson
An experienced trial lawyer who handles both hourly and contingent fee cases, Steve has expertise in class actions, antitrust litigation, securities litigation, corporate disputes, intellectual property disputes, unfair competition claims, and disputes involving family wealth. Steve regularly represents individuals and businesses in federal and state court and has obtained class-wide recovery in multiple class actions. A veteran practitioner, Steve's clients value his creative approach to resolving complex litigation matters.

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The information contained in this blog does not constitute legal advice, and does not create an attorney-client relationship. We make no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained in or linked to this blog.