A class action lawsuit has been filed by a resident of the Surfside, Florida, building that collapsed in the early morning of June 24, 2021 against the Champlain Towers South Building Association Inc. Parts of the Champlain Towers South building collapsed with approximately 55 units destroyed. As of today, approximately 150 people were still unaccounted for along with 12 deaths. 

The suit claims that the association was informed, had knowledge, or reasonably should have been aware that the building was unsafe leaving residents at risk. Further, the suit states a breach of contract claims for an agreement between the association and condominium owners stating which repairs and maintenance the association would maintain. The cause of the building collapse has still not been determined.


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A class action lawsuit has been filed against GOOP Inc., a modern lifestyle company owned by actress Gwyneth Paltrow. The complaint alleges that a specific GOOP branded candle sometimes explodes during normal use.

The complaint, filed in California, claims that the $75.00 candle was burned for three hours or less before it caught on fire with high flames. The complaint further alleges that consumers have had multiple similar experiences and that GOOP has not initiated a product recall. The suit also states the candle is still available on the company website.

The case is Colby Watson et al. v. Goop Inc., Case No. 2:21-cv-04113, I the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California.


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A California judge recently denied a motion for preliminary approval of a settlement in a Roundup class action. The denial order says the settlement was not reasonable for one group supposedly covered by the settlement; those who used Roundup and have not been diagnosed with Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma (“NHL”).

The court found that the proposed settlement would reduce or eliminate that group to seek appropriate damages if they should develop the disease. It would also require them to submit their claims to medical panels to decide whether Roundup was the direct cause should they develop the disease. The court said a new settlement proposal could be resubmitted if it “…reasonably protects the interests of Roundup users who have not been diagnosed with NHL…”

The case is Ramirez, et al. v. Monsanto Co., Case No. 3:19-cv-02224, In re: Roundup Products Liability Litigation, in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.


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A proposed class action against Costco Wholesale Corporation was filed regarding their Interstate-branded batteries. The complaint alleges that Costco provided a cash refund for the purchase price of the Interstate-branded car battery but also charged the price difference for the replacement battery. The complaint further states that consumers reasonably believed that the “Free Replacement Warranty” would, if the battery was defective and returned during the warranty period, be replaced at no additional cost.

The class, if approved, would encompass anyone who purchased an Interstate-branded battery that contained the “Free Replacement Warranty” at Costco in the United States who were not provided with a free replacement during their warranty period upon returning the defective battery.

The case is Skandrel v. Costco Wholesale Corp., Case No.: 9:21-cv-80826, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida.


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Nestle Waters North America, Inc. is facing a potential class action in New York regarding its Poland Spring brand raspberry lime sparkling water. The lawsuit claims that the water contains very little, if any, real raspberry and lime ingredients.

The lawsuit claims that consumers could reasonably believe that the water would contain an actual amount of raspberry and lime as depicted on their labeling. The lawsuit also states that the labels “taste the real” display would also reasonably lead a consumer to believe there would be actual real raspberry and lime as opposed to the actual artificial ingredients.

The proposed class would be made up of all New York purchasers of the water. The lawsuit is Brandy Oldrey v. Nestle Waters North America Inc., Case No.: 7-21-cv-03885, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.


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If you were an investor in Peloton Interactive, Inc. securities between September 11, 2020 and May 5, 2021, the law firm of Kessler Topaz Meltzer & Check, LLP has filed a lawsuit and the lead plaintiff deadline for responses is due June 28, 2021.

The lawsuit stems from allegations that Peloton’s voluntary recall of its Tread+ and Tread treadmill machines over safety concerns adversely affected investors. The lawsuit alleges that Peloton’s Tread+ caused serious safety concerns to children and pets and that during the class period Peloton misled or failed to disclose such issues.  The Plaintiffs allege that these actions caused Peloton’s stocks to decline.


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check mark image with workersOregon Senator Jeff Merkley and U.S. Representative Bill Foster of Illinois introduced the Investor Choice Act earlier this month. The bill would prohibit broker dealers and investment advisors from forcing investors to agree to mandatory arbitration. The bill also prevents brokers dealers and investment advisors from forcing investors to waive the right to bring a class action lawsuit. The Senate’s version of the bill is available here

The North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA) and Public Investors Advocate Bar Association (PIABA) endorsed the legislation. SEC Commission Chairman Gary Gensler said during his confirmation hearing that investors should be able to chose to go to court to resolve disputes.

Most agreements with individual investors in the financial services industry force customers into arbitration. Many investor advocates want investors to have the option of pursuing claims in court. Arbitration lacks the transparency of court and is sometimes cost prohibitive.

McGraw Hill LLC (“Company”) faces a potential class action lawsuit which alleges that authors who contributed to the Company’s textbooks had their royalties reduced when these textbooks were sold in electronic format. The complaint alleges that McGraw’s publishing agreement copyrights all author’s materials to the Company and then the Company publishes, sells and pays the authors a per-sale percentage royalty.

The complaint further states that on or about 2009, the Company instituted Connect, an online platform that distributes online textbooks. The complaint states that authors were paid for their online sales as a single unit until recently when the Company began paying only the contractually required royalties on the “textbook” portion of the sales price and not the “online” portion.

The case is Flynn et al. v. McGraw Hill LLC, Case No. 1:21-cv-00614, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.


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Image of trading graphPopular online stock trading platform Robinhood announced on January 28, 2021, “In light of recent volatility, we are restricting transactions for certain securities to position closing only, including $AAL, $AMC, $BB, $BBBY, $CTRM, $EXPR, $GME, $KOSS, $NAKD, $NOK, $SNDL, $TR, and $TRVG. We also raised margin requirements for certain securities.” The decision to restrict trading has already led to multiple lawsuits against Robinhood by investors, including in connection with Robinhood’s new restrictions on trading Gamestop, Blackberry, Nokia, and AMC Theaters.  The Chicago Tribune reported that other brokerages, including Schwab, TD Ameritrade, and Interactive Brokers, also limited trading in certain stocks.  Robinhood’s decision drew attention from prominent politicians at both ends of the political spectrum including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (AOC).  Then, Robinhood reversed course and lifted some of the trading restrictions it had just implemented.

Gamestop, in particular, gained attention in recent weeks as the price of its shares surged.  Forbes and other outlets reported that smaller investors drove the price increase as part of a “short squeeze.”  A short squeeze can occur when rapid increases in the price of a stock lead to short sellers (investors who have shorted a stock) covering their positions.  Covering requires buying shares of the stock, which in turn further increases the price.  The Guardian and others have reported that members of the reddit forum wallstreetbets helped drive the rapid increase in the price of Gamestop stock that in turn caused the short squeeze.

A federal class action was filed last week alleging that Wyndham Vacation Resorts Inc. used misleading information to entice plaintiffs to purchase timeshares. Plaintiffs allege that Wyndham is using long lasting sales meetings as well as omitting data about vacation options and overall costs as wells as misrepresentations.

Plaintiffs’ lawsuit states that non-members can book timeshares sometimes at a lower cost than owners and in a shorter timeframe. The suit also alleges that Wyndham failed to disclose during the sales presentations that bookings are to be made an entire year in advance and that chosen destinations are often unavailable.

Class members, if approved, are all persons who signed Wyndham timeshare agreements on or after January 27, 2016 in Florida, who attended a Wyndham sales presentation and for those how tried to cancel their contract but were unsuccessful.

The case is DuBose et al. v. Wyndham Vacation Resort Inc., Case No. 1:20-cv-01118, in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware.


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A class action lawsuit has been filed against the City of Portland, Oregon over the use of tear gas by police to disperse protesters rallying against police brutality. The complaint alleges the use of chemical agents violates protester’s constitutional rights and increases the risk of COVID-19 infections.

The suit was filed in Oregon federal court late Friday by two protesters along with social justice advocacy group Don’t Shoot Portland, and seeks to obtain a temporary restraining order and permanent injunction preventing police from using tear gas as a crowd control tactic.

The case is Don’t Shoot Portland et al. v. City of Portland, case number 3:20-cv-00917, in the U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon.


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An Oregon federal court judge issued an Opinion on May 29, 2020 that the defendant, Ruby Receptionists, Inc., and defense counsel cannot communicate with the class members absent a prior court approval.

On April 24, 2020, the court certified a class action in this matter. Click here to learn more.

The case is McKenzie Law Firm et al. v. Ruby Receptionists, Inc., USDC D. OR, Case No. 3:18-cv-1921-SI. Stoll Berne attorneys Keith Dubanevich and Cody Berne represent the Plaintiffs and the Class.

The opinion can be read here.


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A class action lawsuit has been filed against a New Jersey long-term care facility. The facility is facing more than $220,000 in fines from the state after an investigation.

The named plaintiff said her 75-year-old father died after contracting COVID-19 at the facility.

The lawsuit claims the facility “did not timely diagnose” residents and patients and “failed to properly treat their condition.” It also alleges management only provided masks to registered nurses and not other staff members who interacted with residents.


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On April 24, 2020, an Oregon federal court certified a class of Ruby Receptionists’ customers in a case that arises from claims that the company misled its customers and breached its contracts by billing for time a call was on hold, and by rounding up every call resulting in overcharges.

The court stated that class eligibility includes:

“All persons or entities in the United States who obtained receptionist services from Defendant Ruby Receptionists between November 2, 2012 and May 31, 2018, pursuant to its form Services Agreement.”

Stoll Berne represents the Plaintiffs. The case is in McKenzie Law Firm et al. v. Ruby Receptionists, Inc., USDC D. OR, Case No. 3:18-cv-1921-SI. To read the Court’s opinion, click here. Law360 published an article on this certification and that can be found by clicking here. For more information, contact Stoll Berne attorneys Keith Dubanevich or Cody Berne.


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Attorneys for a man from Humble, Texas filed a class-action lawsuit against the Houston Astros arising out of the sign-stealing scandal. Attorneys for the man, who is an Astros season-ticket holder, filed the lawsuit on behalf of 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 full or partial season ticket holders for “deceptively overcharging them for season tickets while defendants and their employees and representatives knowingly and surreptitiously engaged in a sign-stealing scheme in violation of Major League Baseball Rules and Regulations, and secretly put a deficient product on the field that could result (and now has resulted) in severe penalties instituted by MLB,” according to court documents.

According to the lawsuit, which was filed on February 14, 2020, Wallach is seeking to recover damages for “inappropriate increases” in the season ticket prices, “diminished value of their personal seat licenses,” and an injunction prohibiting the Astros from raising season ticket prices for at least two years. He wants more than $1 million in damages. The complaint alleges a violation of the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act.


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Florida federal court Judge Paul G. Byron preliminarily approved a $27 million settlement in a class action alleging that more than 250,000 Geico customers had been underpaid by the insurance provider. The alleged claims arose from customers who filed insurance claims with Geico for damaged cars declared “totaled” who were denied coverage for approximately $80 in fees when registering a new vehicle. The lawsuit alleged that transferring a title in Florida costs $75.25 and switching tags costs $4.10—both required under state law in order to register a vehicle. The settlement also obligated Geico to amend its policies and pay all title transfer and licensing fees in any actual cash value claim for a “totaled” car in Florida.

The certified class consists of Florida residents insured for private passenger auto physical damage coverage by Geico, who suffered a first-party total loss of a covered, owned vehicle at any time from 2012 to April 2019. The settlement excludes leased vehicles insured by Geico.

The case is Sullivan et al. v. Government Employees Insurance Co., case no. 6:17-cv-00891 in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida.


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Mark Joseph Stern at Slate has written an article on explains in a way that many laypeople can understand, why class actions are important and valuable. He also does a great job explaining how the Court’s jurisprudence around forced arbitration has been harmful to workers, consumers and others in wiping out important class actions. To read the article, “The Decade Class Actions Were Gutted,” click here.


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The Public Justice blog recently posted an article, “Major Victory in Oregon Vindicates Class Actions.” To read the blog post, click here.


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An MDL case entitled In re Hyundai and Kia Fuel Economy Litigation involved alleged misrepresentations involving fuel usage for Hyundai and Kia automobiles. A district court in California approved a nationwide $200 million settlement. A divided Ninth Circuit panel reversed the approval of the settlement holding that the district court must weigh all the varying state consumer protection laws before certifying nationwide class action settlements. Lawyers for plaintiffs and defendants saw this troubling decision as a major barrier for settling some type of class actions on a nationwide basis. Fortunately, the full Ninth Circuit reinstated the $200 million settlement and rejected the holding that courts must weigh varying state consumer protection laws before certifying nationwide class action settlements.


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A New York state court judge has granted class action status in a high-profile lawsuit in which many guests at a wedding reception in 2015 became violently ill. Nine ambulances were called to the July 31 reception after guests started vomiting and having diarrhea on the grounds of the Arrowhead Lodge at Oneida Shores Park. The lawsuit alleges the food—specifically the macaroni and cheese—provided by the caterer caused the illnesses.

The bride’s father, is the lead plaintiff in the class action suit. Anyone who ate the macaroni and cheese and became ill is part of the class action suit.

The case attracted national attention, and in part because of that, the judge has ordered the parties not to talk to the media anymore.

The health department investigated and determined there was an outbreak of staphylococcus aureus.

The attorney for the caterer has argued that there is no direct evidence the macaroni and cheese caused the illnesses and also has maintained guests ate other food and beverages not provided by the caterer.


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